Poetry – Milp KBK http://milpkbk.co.uk/ Sat, 14 May 2022 13:16:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://milpkbk.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-22-120x120.png Poetry – Milp KBK http://milpkbk.co.uk/ 32 32 10 poetry books by LGBTQ Asian authors to read right now https://milpkbk.co.uk/10-poetry-books-by-lgbtq-asian-authors-to-read-right-now/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 11:19:20 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/10-poetry-books-by-lgbtq-asian-authors-to-read-right-now/ This content contains affiliate links. When you purchase through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Anti-Asian hatred has been on the rise lately, and I’m not just talking about racist incidents. During the pandemic, many Asians have been attacked and killed, like Michelle Alyssa Go, who was pushed into a Times Square subway […]]]>

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Anti-Asian hatred has been on the rise lately, and I’m not just talking about racist incidents. During the pandemic, many Asians have been attacked and killed, like Michelle Alyssa Go, who was pushed into a Times Square subway station. Even the elderly were not spared. In two separate incidents, two elderly Filipinas were pushed down stairs and onto a train platform.

In a report by Stop AAPI Hate, there were 10,905 hate incidents against Asians between March 19, 2020 and the end of December 2021. Additionally, in a report by the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, it was revealed that anti-Asian hate crimes increased by 339% in 2021 compared to 2020.

Sadly, many still blame Asians for the catastrophic COVID-19 pandemic.

I myself have dreams of moving to New York in the near future. But it made me think, when I go there, will I be safe?

As Asia-Pacific Heritage Month is next month and National Poetry Month is in full swing, here are ten books of poetry by Asian LGBTQ authors in solidarity. In this list, you can find poetry collections from authors across the LGBTQ spectrum: gay, transgender, lesbian, and non-binary, among others. The list also includes works by Asians and Asian Americans.

Poetry Books by LGBTQ Asian Authors

Besiege Me by Nicholas Wong

Wong is a Hong Kong-based poet. In this collection, which is his second after the Lambda Literary Award, crevasse, it delves into the tension between China and Hong Kong. He noted in an interview with Lambda Literary that seat me was inspired by personal and political events in his life, especially the situations in Hong Kong and Taiwan, as well as by his family. Indeed, most of the poems here are about the tense situation in the two countries whose democracy declined when China enforced its controversial security law in Hong Kong.

Three of my favorite poems in this collection are “Apology to a Besieged City”, “Apologia of the Besieged City” and “Alone”.

Here is an exerpt :

Alone in the living room, so much dust.
I approached the window, the jagged horizon.
What if demolition was the true form
of permanence? A nest is a trailing storm.
My family no longer lives with me.
Things are or are not.
Happiness is a notion that rejects
claim. I corrected my texture to fit it.
Furniture has a reputation for being hard.
Why were people still asking me why I was acting like a counter?

Cover of Arrow by Mary Jean Chan

Arrow by Mary Jean Chan

Chan’s debut collection of poetry was a finalist for the 2021 Lambda Literary Award under Lesbian Poetry. Here, the poet writes about her strained relationship with her mother – her non-acceptance of Chan’s sexuality. “Have you ever written about me? / Mom, what do you think? / You are always where I begin. / Always the kid who wanted to be / a boy, so you could be spared / by your mother-in-law,” Chan writes in “Always.” In one entry, she even writes about having an imaginary mother who brings her out so calmly.

Personally, I find “Notes to Understanding” and “To the Grandmother Who Mistook Me for a Boy” so powerful and raw.

Cover of When I Grow Up I Want To Be A List of Other Possibilities by Chen Chen

When I grow up I want to be a list of other possibilities by Chen Chen

This is Chen Chen’s first collection of poetry. He was a finalist for the 30and Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry and was shortlisted for the National Book Award in 2017.

In an interview with Lambda, Chen Chen said this collection is about his mother and his “messy, messy relationship with her” and his difficult life as a young gay man, among other things. “When my mother slapped me / for being dirty, sick, misled by western demons, //a dirty and bad son, I cried, thirteen, already too old, / too masculine to cry,” the poet wrote in an entry. Most of the poems are powerful and it’s hard not to stop for a moment and take them in.

My favorites from the collection are the sensual “Song With a Lyric From Allen Ginsberg” and the moving “Race to the Three”.

Cover of BKL/Bikol Bakla Anthology of Bikolnon Gay Trans Queer Writing, edited by Ryen Paul Sumayao and Jaya Jacobo

BKL / Bikol Bakla: Bikolnon’s Gay Trans Queer Writing Anthologyedited by Ryen Paul Sumayao and Jaya Jacobo

This is an anthology that features the writings of 24 queer Filipino writers from the Bicol region of the Philippines. And while it’s not exactly a collection of poetry, the book contains 42 poems. Anthologies like this are a great contribution to LGBTQ literature in the Philippines, considering the dearth of such books in the said country.

Some poems in BKL/Bikol Bakla are in English, Filipino and Bicolano, the regional language.

My favorites from this collection are “Men In a Pool”, “Gerald Flies From Nagoya To Manila To Legazpi As A Woman” and “Talahiban Blues”, which are sultry. The downside is that although some entries are in English, international readers should have knowledge of the aforementioned local languages.

Cover of Recombinant by Ching-In Chen

recombinant by Ching-In Chen

recombinant is the winner of 30and Lambda Literary Prize for Transgender Poetry. Ching-In Chen integrates history and social issues into his poems. I find the form experimental and unconventional, and it can be a bit jarring to read the poems at first. But ultimately it would make sense if you get the full picture. It’s fresh and enlightening.

My favorites are “Diagram a Ghost” and “Dear Island Letter Writer”.

Cover of Gaze Back by Marylyn Tan

Looking Back by Marylyn Tan

This is the first collection of the Singaporean poet Tan. The collection challenges the idea of ​​femininity, as with the poem “Blades Named Delilah”. Tan even admits in his memo that the collection was “born out of disgust, hatred, disillusionment and a certain embodied fatigue of being over-scrutinized, by self and by society.”

To like recombinant, I find the poems experimental and audacious. My favorites are the entries in the Universe Sexts section, which are sassy and delicious.

Cover of Tingle: Anthology of Pinay Lesbian Writing by Jhoanna Lynn Cruz

Tingle: An Anthology of Pinay Lesbian Writing by Jhoanna Lynn B. Cruz

Although it’s not exactly a collection of poetry, there are plenty of poems scattered between the pages. As a Filipino, this type of collection is rare and valuable. We get a lot of books from other people on the LGBTQ spectrum, but we rarely get anything from lesbian writers. “During all these years of the feminist movement and the defense of gay rights, where was the Filipina lesbian writer? She was there, but not there”, writes the editor.

The authors of the collection aim to answer this question of writing: “What makes you tingle as a lesbian? My favorite poems are “Brrroom”, “For Mama” and “Coming Up for Air”.

Cover of poems of a penisist by Mutsuo Takahashi

Poems of a penisist by Mutsuo Takahashi

Published in 1975 and written by one of Japan’s most famous poets, this is considered an important work on homosexual desire. Here, the author takes us into the Japanese gay scene. For Takahashi, desire is something sacred and not something to be ashamed of. Poems can be self-explanatory, but boy, are they so much fun to read.

The collection has been dubbed “one of the most important compilations of homoerotic poetry written in the 20th century.”

My favorites are “Dove”, “Mirrors or Narcissism” and “End of Summer”.

Here’s an excerpt from “Dove”:

I like his eyes, he said and he touched them
I also like its beak, I said it and I touched it

But, he said and looked at me
But what, I said, I watched it

But you even more, he said
Oh no, I said and looked down

I love you, he says and releases the dove
It’s gone, I whispered
In her arms

Cover of Revenge of the Asian Woman by Dorothy Chan

Revenge of the Asian Woman by Dorothy Chan

This collection was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Poetry in 2020. I love how rich it is in East Asian culture – boba tea, jewelry, noodles, basically all the trappings of Hong Kong culture. The poems are evocative and nostalgic, reminiscent of old and freer Hong Kong.

I also like the shameless tone of the poems here. My favorites are “Triple Sonnet for Autoerotica”, “Five Years Ago in Singapore” and “Ode to the First Boy Who Made Me Feel It”.

Cover of Time Is a Mother by Ocean Vuong

Time is a Mother by Ocean Vuong

This is Vuong’s second collection of poetry after the famous and award-winning Night sky with exit wounds.

time is a mother is his most personal and lyrical collection to date. In this living collection, he writes about dealing with the grief of losing his mother. When discussing the events of his life, Vuong’s language is so precise, evocative and masterful. If you liked his first collection, then you’ll like this one even more.

I can’t choose which are my favorites, but “Snow Theory”, “Reasons for Staying”, “Tell Me Something Good” and “Dear Rose” really stand out for me.

Here’s an excerpt from “Snow Theory”:

Another country burning on TV
What we’ll always have is something we’ve lost
In the snow, the dry silhouette of my mother
Promise me you won’t disappear again, I said
She stood there for a while, thinking
One by one the houses turned off their lights
I lay on her outline, to keep her true
Together we made an angel
It felt like something being destroyed in a blizzard
I haven’t killed anything since


These books of poetry by LGBTQ Asian authors are undiscovered gems in the oversaturated and cluttered poetry genre.

Looking to read more books by Asian authors? Here is a list of 100 essential books.

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Andrea Abi-Karam, “Poetry as Forces” https://milpkbk.co.uk/andrea-abi-karam-poetry-as-forces/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 17:41:32 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/andrea-abi-karam-poetry-as-forces/ Andrea Abi-Karam. (Courtesy of Andrea Abi-Karam) Editor’s note: Welcome to National Poetry Month. Twice a week in April, KQED Arts & Culture will present a poem by a Bay Area poet. This series is organized by correct host Pendarvis Harshaw, who also speaks with each poet about their work. Andrea Abi-Karam, “POETRY AS STRENGTHS”, AFTER […]]]>

Andrea Abi-Karam. (Courtesy of Andrea Abi-Karam)

Editor’s note: Welcome to National Poetry Month. Twice a week in April, KQED Arts & Culture will present a poem by a Bay Area poet. This series is organized by correct host Pendarvis Harshaw, who also speaks with each poet about their work.

Andrea Abi-Karam, “POETRY AS STRENGTHS”, AFTER Cecilia Vicuña

The “about to arrive” / “poetry as forces” – when Cecilia Vicuña says that the lies (the words, the language) of the Chilean dictatorship murdered and tortured thousands of people, I remember the power of word and I remember the power of poetry – “made of forces” – which contains something in the action of language – material consequences can occur – not always – literal action is necessary but the line between language and the action is no longer as precise as the street against the consequences – an emergence of literature – without restraint

I ask questions like

how to weaponize my own body

or what’s left

how can we arm ourselves

how to arm the poem (words as weapons)

give teeth to the poem

overstay his vacation

with sharpness

momentary and transient criminal aesthetic

an unpublished sketch

of affinities

explicit revenge fantasy

& pride orgy

accumulation becomes

a book

a constellation of blues

a blockade

a dancing night

on the highway

Andrea Abi-Karam alongside,

inside, erupting

out of

we sharpen

our teeth

& make attempts

glass breakage

disturbance

simultaneous

Andrea Abi-Karam wears a pair of white roller skates, shorts and a black fishnet shirt while posing in front of a white Mustang convertible
Andrea Abi-Karam. (Courtesy of Andrea Abi-Karam)

Pendarvis Harshaw: What specifically inspired this piece?

Andrea Abi-Karam: “POETRY AS STRENGTHS” AFTER Cecilia Vicuña is directly inspired by the groundbreaking life and work of oral performer, poet and visual artist Cecilia Vicuña, looking towards the movements and interventions her work has been part of in the face of the Chilean dictatorship (1973-1990) and seeks to apply these interventions to a contemporary context. One of the many elements I love about Cecilia Vicuña’s performances is that they are collaborative with the audience and the environment around her – she invites everyone to participate. This invitation embraces spontaneity, disruption and adaptation to predetermined performance and revels in the possibility of collective strength.

In the face of injustice, what can words and poems do?

I believe that action is necessary to fight injustice, and that poetry can be an accomplice to this action, but cannot oppose it alone. This is something that Kay Gabriel and I delve into in the introduction to We Want It All: An Anthology of Radical Trans Poetics (Nightboat Books, 2020).

How does your identity influence your art?

I write a lot from my own experience where my multitude of identities as queer, trans, and Arab-American are permeated throughout, but not always the main topic. I write a lot about the dangers and the need to be visibly queer and trans in public – I think it’s important to demand space for queer and trans revelry in public space, and in the face of danger, friendship and community prevail. I also delve into the stories and literary heritage of SWANA, of which I am a part, and work to draw attention to post-9/11 state and military violence. Some writers who constantly inspire me are Etel Adnan, Solmaz Sharif, Marwa Helal, George Abraham and Fargo Tbakhi.

Where are you from and where can people find more of your work?

I grew up in Connecticut and lived in Boston, Oakland and New York. I came of age as a trans person and a poet in Oakland. Kelsey Street Press in Berkeley published my first book ADDITIONAL TRANSMISSION (2019), which is a critique of US military involvement in the War on Terror. In the fall of 2021, Nightboat Books published my second book Infamywhich reinvents the militant community in the wake of the ghost ship burning and the Muslim ban.

Follow events and other activities on Andrea Abi-Karam’s website or on Instagram.

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Out and About WRAL.com https://milpkbk.co.uk/out-and-about-wral-com/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 17:21:04 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/out-and-about-wral-com/ By Amber Brown Lantern press: Star Rose Spine Clock by Fran WildeAward-winning fantasy author Fran Wilde returns to her roots in Star Rose Spine Clockbringing together poems previously published in Strange magazine, Magazine by the fire, and more, as well as a selection of unpublished works. In this illuminated collection of whimsical fountain pen illustrations, […]]]>

Lantern press: Star Rose Spine Clock by Fran Wilde
Award-winning fantasy author Fran Wilde returns to her roots in Star Rose Spine Clockbringing together poems previously published in Strange magazine, Magazine by the fire, and more, as well as a selection of unpublished works. In this illuminated collection of whimsical fountain pen illustrations, Wilde explores family histories, feminism, visual arts, disability, mythology and of course the sea with tangible longing and insightful insight.

Coffee press: Fighting is like a woman by Eloisa Amezcua
In Fighting is like a woman, Eloisa Amezcua uses striking visual poems to reconstruct the love story – and tragedy – of two-time world boxing champion “Schoolboy” Bobby Chacon and his first wife, Valorie Ginn. Bobby began to fight like a surfer takes on water: waves and crests, ups and downs. Valorie, as girlfriend, then wife, then mother of their children, was proud of Bobby and how he found a way out of the difficult world they were born into. But the brain shots, women, and booze started to take their toll, and soon Bobby couldn’t hear him. With her fate tied to Bobby’s and Bobby’s in the ring, Valorie sought her own way out of this dilemma.

These trees, these leaves, this flower, this fruit

Milkweed Editions: These trees, these leaves, this flower, this fruit: poems by Hayan Charara
With These trees, these leaves, this flower, this fruit, Hayan Charara presents readers with a potpourri of ambitious analysis, written in characteristic ironic verse. He takes philosophers to task, jousts with academics, and scrutinizes hollow gestures of empathy, exposing the dangers of thinking of ourselves “separate / from our]thoughts and experiences.” After all, “No work of love / will flourish out of guilt, fear, or emptiness of heart.” But how do we act on the fullness of the heart? How, knowing like us that “genocide is inscribed in our oldest and most holy texts”?

Soft skull press: Path of Totality: Poems by Niina Pollari
This collection is about the eviscerating loss of a child, the hope that precedes this crisis and the suffering that follows. Spare, simple, sometimes startling in their bits of humor, Pollari’s poems sank into the “tilted reality” of grief. It’s poetry extracted from shock and rage, then dissected with pointillist precision. Many pieces are closer to prose: in clear, forceful language that will captivate readers outside of poetry audiences, they reveal and name feelings outside of what is expected in books about loss and bereavement. children: for example, the embarrassment Niina felt for allowing herself to feel hope and joy, for revealing that she desired to be a mother at all, and for having to inform the world that her desire would not be not granted.

Customs

Graywolf Press: Customs: Poems by Solmaz Sharif
In Customs, Solmaz Sharif examines what it means to exist in the nothingness of the arrivals terminal, a continuous series of checkpoints, officers, searches and interrogations that become an endless experience of America. With resignation and austerity, these poems trace a pointed indoctrination to the customs of the nation-state and the English language, and to the realities which they impose on the imagination, to the rhythms which they make us undergo. As Sharif critiques the culture of performed social skills and poetry itself – its foreclosures, its affects, its successes – she begins to write her way to the other side of acceptability and to freedom.

Press 53: body in motion by Joseph Mills
The poems in body in motion, the seventh collection of poems by Joseph Mills, offers a look at our relationship to dance, from childhood to adulthood, “To consider life as a dance is to hope / that there is a choreographer who has / some kind of vision, and an audience / who appreciates the effort.” According to Nebraska State Poet Laureate Matt Mason, “Bodies in Motion is bound by poems about dance but shrewdly twirls between characters doing the funky chicken in the kitchen to dance The Nutcracker on stage in a gym full of hangout teenagers. It goes back and forth to the rhythm of the movements of black holes in the universe, of George Washington, of Charles Dickens, of wedding receptions, of parents and their families, of dance classes, of Hollywood musicals, and so on. Pin up.”

Runaway with bedbug

Anansi press: Runaway with bedbug by Anne-Marie Turza
Be amazed by the metaphysical snails and ghosts of footnotes in the dark. Runaway with bedbug is part musical reference, part portrait, a series of eerie poems dealing with time and mortality, an eccentric essay and a musical score. Using the fugue form as a foil and strategy for silent composition, poet Anne-Marie Turza argues that the mission: “after the fact, was Jell-O, a salad of delicate intention and shimmy . . .”

Seven Story Press: How Chet Baker Died: Poems by Barry Gifford
The mystery in these poems lives just beyond the province of words. In a strange way, Barry Gifford’s poems tell a story without words, freed from the artistry of the writer. “It’s dangerous to remember / so much, especially for a writer / The temptation to make sense / is always there / where you and I / are no longer.” Daily life, family and friends, are much more important here than books. The beauty and elusiveness of women and music are of utmost importance, much more so than literature. As he attests: “I prefer music to poems, words don’t live the same way, so listen up.

Content Warning: All

Copper Canyon Press: Content Warning: All by Akwaeke Emezi
In their bold debut collection of poetry, Akwaeke Emezi, award-winning author of Fresh water, PET, The death of Vivek Ojiand Dear Senthuran— imagine a new depth of belonging. Crafted from divine and earthly materials, these poems travel from home to homesickness, tracing the desire to surrender and abuse to survival, while mapping a chosen family that includes God’s son, Mary. aunt and Madeleine with brown eyes. Written from a spiritual perspective and celebrating the essence of self that is impossible to drown, kill or reduce, Content Warning: All distills the radiant power and epic grief of a mischievous and eager young deity, embodied.

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Poetry Contest: Your best humanist haiku for National Poetry Month https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-contest-your-best-humanist-haiku-for-national-poetry-month/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 15:20:49 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-contest-your-best-humanist-haiku-for-national-poetry-month/ TheHumanist.com is pleased to announce the winners of our third annual haiku contest in honor of National Poetry Month. Three weeks ago, we asked for haiku entries on humanism and humanist values. Submissions had to be in the form of a haiku, a seemingly simple three-line form of poetry: five syllables on line one, seven […]]]>

TheHumanist.com is pleased to announce the winners of our third annual haiku contest in honor of National Poetry Month.

Three weeks ago, we asked for haiku entries on humanism and humanist values. Submissions had to be in the form of a haiku, a seemingly simple three-line form of poetry: five syllables on line one, seven syllables on line two, and five syllables on line three.

We received eighty-four entries, our judges picked seven of their favorites, and you can read them below. Many thanks to all the poets who submitted their haikus. And another big thank you to our jury: Nicole Carr, Anna Clay, Emily Newman, Meredith Thompson, Kate Uesugi and Peter Bjork.

Winners will also appear in the summer issue of our print magazine.

Here, in random order, are our top humanist haikus of 2022:


Sharpen the pen of the mind
Fill the well with ink and draw
Experience

—Justin Hauxwell

It’s not very hard.
Common sense shows us the way.
Love is the answer.

—Steve W.

Inhabit nature
Take control of your destiny
Unlimited potential

—Jean Waller

World humanity
A universe of wonders
My worship.

—Russell Dick

What advances…
Fantasy, faith or prayer?
No, people move us

-Don Sturm

live for now
And live for each other
It’s Humanism

—Justin Hauxwell

Pampas grass spreading plumes
On the other side of this hill. The midday sun is coming.
We feast on shine.

—John Laue

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Poetry about being a taxi driver in New York https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-about-being-a-taxi-driver-in-new-york/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 11:10:18 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-about-being-a-taxi-driver-in-new-york/ Collection of poetry by Sean Singer, Today in the Taxi, could easily be described as a vivid portrait of ridesharing in New York in the years leading up to the pandemic. At bottom, however, these poems read like unaddressed letters sent to help us navigate a troubling modern world. While driving a taxi in New […]]]>


Collection of poetry by Sean Singer, Today in the Taxi, could easily be described as a vivid portrait of ridesharing in New York in the years leading up to the pandemic. At bottom, however, these poems read like unaddressed letters sent to help us navigate a troubling modern world.

While driving a taxi in New York for six years, Singer is the victim of a carjacking, has a baby in his car, drives a nearly dying young man, stiffens up, gets scolded, flirts and cries, and drives a few celebrities. What carries it through is also what makes this book go beyond a compilation of anecdotes and a meaningful book for our time: Singer’s lyricism unveils a voracious spirit at work, a spirit enriched by books and music and shaped by many types of grief. Singer considers Kafka, Wanda Coleman, Jacqueline du Pré and various jazz musicians both invoked and found in his backseat. The thread of jazz in this book will come as no surprise to previous readers of his work, which includes his first collection, Discography, winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets and the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America. Singer is also a recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship and author of the collection Honey & Smokeand he writes the daily newsletter L’Affûteur: thinking through poetry.

We talked over email about writing a collection of poetry inspired by his experiences driving a cab.


Rebecca Morgan Frank: Where and when were you driving a taxi?

Sean Singer: I drove the taxi from fall 2014 until the start of the pandemic in March 2020.

RMF: It’s hard not to think of Jim Jarmusch’s film night on earth when taking this collection, and of course you address this directly with the poem”night on earth (Directed by Jim Jarmusch, 1991)”—Winona Ryder also plays a part in your poem. How did this film influence this collection?

Due to the danger of driving himself and the risk of violence from passengers, the driver must constantly analyze and evaluate and then reject most of what happens.

SS: I like the movie, but it’s more of a fantasy than something that shows what it really is. The film shows the strangeness of the characters and the watchful nihilism, or quiet risk-taking involved in driving a taxi. Due to the danger of driving himself and the risk of violence from passengers, the driver must constantly analyze and evaluate and then reject most of what happens. The work is 90% boredom and 10% sheer terror.

RMF: The Jarmusch soundtrack featured Tom Waits: what were you listening to in the cab? What would the playlist for this collection include?

SS: I mostly listened to WQXR, which is the classic New York station. I find that classical music has a very calming effect on people. But if there was a playlist for the collection, it would include Arvo Pärt’s “Tabula Rasa” and of course the music of Charles Mingus, who is one of the “main characters”.

RMF: Let’s talk about another main character: Kafka appears throughout the book. How did he end up in your cab, so to speak?

SS: Kafka, Mingus and the Lord (who is a female voice) appear in the book as guides through the Styx that is New York. Kafka is for me the most important writer. He is sympathetic because of our origins, our family dynamics and our psychodynamic attitudes.

Each of the journeys is a transition in the small world of the passenger; the driver is present, but ultimately an outside observer.

The time I was driving was a time of tremendous upheaval in American life – escalating culture wars, the rise of totalitarianism – and a time of great loss in my own life. These poems reflect my way of living and thinking about the problems of that time. Three main themes emerge: what it means to work in the labor economy at a time when the income divide is dramatically deepening, watching my New York home transform through time and history, and charting my relationship with the Jewish experience at a time of rising anti-Semitism.

Kafka was a figure who could approach some of this material that allowed me to enter these conflicts in a less frontal way.

FMR: As you mentioned, there is also the presence of the “Lord” throughout the book: she cleans, collects plastic bottles from trash cans in Williamsburg, and is sometimes prophetic. How and when did she find her place in the book, and what do you see as her role?

SS: The Lord in the poems is a guide, an ethical GPS, allowing the reader to witness with the driver. She is an Old Testament lord because one of the tenets of Judaism is uncertainty or questioning, and I believe these poems try to portray the situations depicted as questions first and foremost. The relationship between the speaker and the subjects of the poems – often the city itself – is a matter of interrogation. These questions are often unresolved or without definitive answers.

She is a force of empathy, but also sometimes vengeful, merciful or a force of justice. Since a poem is a public space, a city’s personal memory becomes a city’s public expression. Since identity is linked to memory, I aimed for poems that showed the links between the driver’s private world and a world shared with strangers in the car. I wanted my poems to ethically describe the urban space, but as poems in search of justice, rather than as aesthetic objects.

Justice is love and the figure of the Lord in the poems is a stable ray, the lines on the road that show us which is the right path. She has a feminine voice I think for several reasons: She’s unexpected, confuses tradition with expectation, and is a way to balance a report of relief and loss. My mother died of a brain tumor while I was writing the book, and I suspect the Lord having a female voice is a way to preserve His direction and trust in me.

RMF: You really make incredible turns in these poems, sometimes dark, sometimes funny, sometimes transcendent. These seem to perfectly reflect the dissonance between the outer life of the job and the inner life of the driver, including your personal grief. Can you say more about how you found your way to those tight turns?

SS: The metaphorical power of poetry lies in connecting unrelated things. It also has metabolic power, which is physical and involves the ear and the breath. Finally, it has a metamorphic power, which concerns self-transformation. Car turns are a bit of all of this because you have to avoid hitting anything: bicycles, dogs, horses, cars, buses, trucks, people, objects; some of the riding is of course physical, but most of it is mental. Alert attention should be met with calm, but also, especially in New York, aggressive and defensive. I also had to fight with my self-image. Was I a writer, a failed academic, a driver or what?

The turns in the poems allow the self to move in and out of these states and spaces. The poems are filled with contradictions because the task is so contradictory: to sit and move, calm and assertive, to look ahead but have to talk to someone behind you, to listen to intensely private moments but be invisible.

I wanted to convey the spontaneity and fatality of the interactions I had. I wanted to find ways to connect the immediacy of my embodied experience with the electricity of language. I felt each of the poems in my body because I was there commuting for five years. I lived each of these poems, and a lot of it was physical.

RMF: Jazz has informed your previous work, and this collection is no exception. How do the structures and rhythms of jazz continue to influence you?

SS: Jazz is about being joyful despite the conditions, and that’s rhythm. Rhythm is a way of dividing and organizing time. Part of the form in the book is the phrase “Today in the taxi” (or some variation of it depending on the time of day), so the cumulative effect is one of a kind an endless recurring series of paths which have a constant element and a variable element. The rapid turns of the poems are like those of the car, and these surprises come from my interest in the freedom of jazz.

RMF: This condensed chronicle of so many years appears to us as readers as a liminal space, a timelessness shaped by continual transitions, but this rhythmically repeated line, “Today in the taxi”, also grounds us in each present. individual without date and without time. Was there a daily record from which the book emerged?

Anything can and does happen in New York, and the car is a small version of that.

SS: Yes. I kept a notebook in the car and while driving I was able to remember every trip I took. Over 8,000 trips, I could remember each person, where I picked them up and where they were going. The constancy of this line reiterates the similarity of each journey and allows the driver to be like Charon, a cosmic ferryman, whose boat carried the souls of the dead across the river of death.

Each of the journeys is a transition in the small world of the passenger; the driver is present, but ultimately an outside observer. The eerie anonymous intimacy also means the driver’s inner monologue and what he reads and hears can permeate his entry into these little worlds.

RMF: Is there a story from your taxi experiences that has never been the subject of a poem, but that you would have liked?

SS: Once this drunk man approached the car and said “I need a taxi”. I said, “I’m expecting another passenger.” He said, immediately enraged, “Who? Who the fuck are you waiting for? I told her Alexandra because a young woman had called me and asked me to wait in a particular place.

Then I thought he was drunk and was going to leave, but he got in the car. So I repeated, “I can’t take you.” I’m expecting another passenger. He shouted, “I’m Alexandra’s fucking father!” Don’t, don’t fucking tell me you’re waiting for someone else! You’re going to Berkeley Heights, New Jersey!

This kind of abuse was common. There were other times when women tried to flirt, pick me up, or invite me out.

A third moment happened on New Years Eve when I was hijacked by a guy who demanded I take him to Coney Island. He told me to pull over somewhere on Surf Avenue so he could pee at a construction site and I drove off and left him there.

Anything can and does happen in New York, and the car is a small version of that.

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It All Started With A Sneeze: The Origin Story Of Magnetic Poetry https://milpkbk.co.uk/it-all-started-with-a-sneeze-the-origin-story-of-magnetic-poetry/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/it-all-started-with-a-sneeze-the-origin-story-of-magnetic-poetry/ When was the last time you used a magnetic poetry kit? I recently discovered that magnetic poetry can now be experienced through the magic of the internet. There’s something dramatic about watching the jerky word salad, words freed from paper prison and stuck to fridge doors alongside family photos and lists of important numbers. Slightly […]]]>

When was the last time you used a magnetic poetry kit? I recently discovered that magnetic poetry can now be experienced through the magic of the internet. There’s something dramatic about watching the jerky word salad, words freed from paper prison and stuck to fridge doors alongside family photos and lists of important numbers. Slightly angled word magnets give any text an experimental vibe, and typing in pre-chosen words allows for inspiration without overthinking.

Even in its digital format, something about the process works. Is it a poem or a collage project? Is it the easy way out or the release of your creativity? A magnetic poetry kit gives you the aesthetics of an innovative work of art, but you don’t have to find the words yourself.

I wrote poetry when I was younger. Raised on fairy tales and romantic comedies, I was a dramatic thing in my youth, full of idealistic notions of true love, grand gestures, and tortured romance (capitals very much wanted). Even though I never felt like my poetry was particularly good, that didn’t stop me from scribbling love odes on the pages of my notebooks or on the backs of scraps of paper. Eventually, I quit – after taking poetry writing classes in college and getting confirmation from the prof that, unfortunately, it wasn’t a genre of writing where I excelled. Since then the only poetry I’ve tried has been magnetic and stuck to a fridge and somehow it still makes me feel brilliant. So think of this as both an exploration of magnetic poetry as an object and an ode to its enduring goodness.

The History of Magnetic Poetry

As a kid in the 90s, magnetic poetry was everywhere. I can’t remember a time before fridge poetry existed, but it turns out it was 1993. Once upon a time in Minneapolis, a songwriter named Dave Kapell had a fortuitous case of allergies. Look, Magnetic Poetry might not have the craziest origin stories, but it’s a damn good anecdote.

In a 2015 interview with Atlas Obscura, Kapell explained how he came up with the first model. One night he was battling an attack of writer’s block using the cut-out writing technique. He sneezed, and it accidentally caused his sheets of paper to explode, mixing up the words. To prevent this from happening again, he had the idea of ​​sticking the words on magnets. Originally, magnetic sheets had their home on a cookie tray; at some point he moved them to the refrigerator. Friends loved it, and he thought he might have something. Then, according to lore written on the kits official website, Kapell was inspired by the enthusiasm of his friends to try and sell his kits at a craft fair. It sold out quickly and soit had started.

But let’s back up because some of you might be wondering what the cutout writing technique is.

The cut-out writing technique

It’s a writing exercise that encourages creativity by putting words together. First, the writer finds an article or a job. Once the text is chosen, the writer then cuts the text into smaller chunks of one or two words. It is appreciated by artists and writers. One of the first to popularize this method was Tristan Tzara, an avant-garde poet and one of the founding fathers of Dadaism. Tzara wanted to spread his method of poetic writing and created “To Make A Dadaïst Poem”, a short list which describes the method divided into ten steps. According to William S. Burroughs’ essay, “The Cut Up Method,” “At a Surrealist gathering in the 1920s, Tristan Tzara…proposed to create a poem on the spot by pulling words out of a hat. A riot ensued…”

Burroughs goes on to explain that the next big name to practice the technique was a painter, Brion Gysin, who “cut newspaper articles into sections and randomly rearranged the sections.”.“Burroughs popularized the cut-up method and musicians like David Bowie and Kurt Cobain used it to regularly create their songs.

In terms of inspiration from Kapell? He started using the method after seeing David Bowie talking about it on television.

The Current Existence of Magnetic Poetry Kits

Now, it’s been 29 years since Kapell’s fateful sneeze. You can still buy all kinds of magnetic word mixes – in addition to the original, there are kits for children, in other languages ​​and on themes like nature, books and the apocalypse. In the Atlas Obscura article, Kapell explained that the company tries to stay relevant and keep up with popular memes (see their Bacon kit). And while Magnetic Poetry may not be as ubiquitous as it once was, it has survived a major refrigerator overhaul. According to a 2013 article by Business Internhomeowners switching to stainless steel refrigerators have significantly reduced Kapell’s business.

Yet he survived because the call remains important. The cut-out writing style is for everyone, regardless of their own skill level. It gives you the words to write and do, instead of spending time choosing the “perfect” words. Magnetic poetry made the technique of decoupage a collective art – so many times I would write something on a fridge and later come back to find it slightly altered. Its meaning shifted by a word or formatting change. There’s always been something quite beautiful about it, and I think that’s why the kits have endured.

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Commentary: Poetry comes to our aid | Columnists https://milpkbk.co.uk/commentary-poetry-comes-to-our-aid-columnists/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 02:30:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/commentary-poetry-comes-to-our-aid-columnists/ By Marsha Mercer After Black History Month in February and Women’s History Month in March, April brings us National Poetry Month. One could argue that black and women’s history, as well as poetry, should be observed year-round, not just for a month. But grouping events into roughly 30 days helps draw attention to topics we […]]]>

By Marsha Mercer

After Black History Month in February and Women’s History Month in March, April brings us National Poetry Month.

One could argue that black and women’s history, as well as poetry, should be observed year-round, not just for a month. But grouping events into roughly 30 days helps draw attention to topics we might otherwise overlook.

I thought National Poetry Month was celebrated in April because it was Shakespeare’s birth month or because of TS Eliot’s first line in “The Waste Land,” “April is the

They probably didn’t hurt, but the Academy of American Poets says Black and Women’s History Month inspired National Poetry Month in 1996 to remind people “that poets have a essential role to play in our culture and that poetry matters”.

The academy, despite its government-sounding name, is a member-based charity. Marie Bullock was just 23 when she started the academy in her New York apartment in 1934. It was after studying in France, where she was impressed by the leading role poets play in the French culture.

People also read…

We always hear that poetry may be dead, but miraculously it survives.

A 2017 survey by the National Endowment for the Arts, the most recent, found that 12% of adults had read poetry in the past year. This sounds paltry, but was hailed as encouraging news: it meant that 28 million adults were actually reading a poem, and 12% was the highest share of the population to have read poetry in 15 years.

Poetry has been boosted by the inauguration of President Joe Biden. When Amanda Gorman, a 23-year-old black woman, read her beautiful poem, “The Hill We Climb,” at the grand opening (was it only last year?), she became a cultural icon.

Gorman proved that poetry is alive, vibrant and, yes, cool. A collection of his poems, “Call Us What We Carry,” was published in December and became a New York Times bestseller.

National Poetry Month has become “the biggest literary celebration in the world,” says the academy, which offers resources for celebrating poetry at home, in the classroom or elsewhere on poets.org.

These include 30 activities, such as writing a poem, reading an e-book of poetry from your local library, buying a book of poetry from your local bookstore, and signing up for a poem per day.

If you’re wondering why bother or what poetry can do for you, USA Poet Laureate Joy Harjo has an answer:

“Poetry can make someone fall in love with you. Poetry can make you fall in love with yourself,” Harjo says in the trailer for his online masterclass in poetic thinking. urge people to read and write poetry, what will do?

Harjo, the first Native American Poet Laureate in U.S. history, will complete her third and final year in the position this month, with several events that will be streamed live on the Library’s YouTube channel and Facebook page. Congress.

For her flagship project, she created “Living Nations, Living Words,” an online presentation and interactive map, to showcase the work of 47 Indigenous poets.

If we ever needed poetry, now is the time. With so much horrific news bombarding us, poetry can be a solace on the page, online or on social media.

People are turning to poetry to help make sense of the pandemic, isolation, war, and other stresses.

Kitty O’Meara, a retired teacher and chaplain, wrote a hopeful prose poem during the first pandemic lockdown in March 2020. She posted it for a small group of her Facebook friends, and it went viral . It begins:

And people stayed home.

And read books and listen, rest and exercise,

And made art and played games,

And learned new ways of being and still were.

And listened more deeply.

While some grumpy readers complained that O’Meara’s poem reflects a privileged and fantastical view of the first lockdown, it rang true for many others. It was turned into a picture book and an operatic solo that Renee Fleming sang. It was also published in an anthology of pandemic poems.

We can all be grateful to poets as we celebrate poetry this month and every month.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington. Contact her at marsha.mercer@yahoo.com.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington. Contact her at: marsha.mercer@yahoo.com

© 2022, Marsha Mercer. All rights reserved.

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Marsha Mercer: Poetry comes to our rescue | Marsha Mercer https://milpkbk.co.uk/marsha-mercer-poetry-comes-to-our-rescue-marsha-mercer/ Sun, 10 Apr 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/marsha-mercer-poetry-comes-to-our-rescue-marsha-mercer/ MARSHA MERCER After Black History Month in February and Women’s History Month in March, April brings us National Poetry Month. It could be argued that black and women’s history, as well as poetry, should be observed year-round, not just for a month, but grouping events over roughly 30 days helps draw attention to topics that […]]]>

MARSHA MERCER

After Black History Month in February and Women’s History Month in March, April brings us National Poetry Month.

It could be argued that black and women’s history, as well as poetry, should be observed year-round, not just for a month, but grouping events over roughly 30 days helps draw attention to topics that we might otherwise forget.

I thought National Poetry Month was celebrated in April because it was Shakespeare’s birth month or because of TS Eliot’s opening line in The Wasteland, “April is the cruellest month.. .”

They probably didn’t hurt, but the Academy of American Poets says Black and Women’s History Month inspired National Poetry Month in 1996 to remind people “that poets have a essential role to play in our culture and that poetry matters”.

The academy, despite its government-sounding name, is a member-based charity. Marie Bullock was just 23 when she started the academy in her New York apartment in 1934 after studying in France, where she was impressed by the prominent role poets play in French culture.

People also read…

We always hear that poetry may be dead, but miraculously it survives.

A 2017 survey by the National Endowment for the Arts, the most recent survey, found that 12% of adults had read poetry in the previous year. This sounds paltry, but was hailed as encouraging news because it meant 28 million adults were actually reading a poem, and 12% was the highest share of the population reading poetry in 15 years.

Poetry has been boosted by the inauguration of President Joe Biden. When Amanda Gorman, a 23-year-old black woman, read her beautiful poem, “The Hill We Climb,” at the grand opening – was it just last year? – she became a cultural icon, proving that poetry is alive, vibrant and, yes, cool.

A collection of his poems, “Call Us What We Carry,” was published last December and became a New York Times bestseller.

National Poetry Month has become “the largest literary celebration in the world,” says the academy, which offers resources for celebrating poetry at home or in the classroom at www.poets.org.

These include 30 activities, such as writing a poem, reading an e-poetry book at your local library, buying a poetry book at your local bookstore, and signing up for a poem per day.

If you’re wondering why bother or what poetry can do for you, USA Poet Laureate Joy Harjo has an answer:

“Poetry can make someone fall in love with you. Poetry can make you fall in love with yourself,” Harjo says in the trailer for his online MasterClass in Poetic Thinking. people to read and write poetry, what will do?

Harjo, the first Native American Poet Laureate in U.S. history, will complete her third and final year in the position this month with several events that will be streamed live on the Library of Congress YouTube channel and Facebook page. .

For her flagship project, she created “Living Nations, Living Words,” an online presentation and interactive map, to showcase the work of 47 Indigenous poets.

If we ever needed poetry, now is the time. With so much horrific news bombarding us, poetry can be a solace on the page, online or on social media.

People are turning to poetry to help make sense of the pandemic, isolation, war, and other stresses.

A hopeful prose poem that Kitty O’Meara, a retired teacher and chaplain, wrote during the first pandemic lockdown in March 2020 and posted for a small group of her Facebook friends has gone viral. It begins:

And people stayed home.

And read books and listen, rest and exercise,

And made art and played games,

And learned new ways of being and still were.

And listened more deeply.

While some grumpy readers complained that O’Meara’s poem reflects a privileged and fantastical view of the first lockdown, it rang true for many others. It was turned into a picture book and an operatic solo that Renee Fleming sang and published in an anthology of pandemic poems.

We can all be grateful to poets as we celebrate poetry this month – and every month.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington. You can contact her at marsha.mercer@yahoo.com.

]]>
Their point of view: poetry comes to save us | Editorial https://milpkbk.co.uk/their-point-of-view-poetry-comes-to-save-us-editorial/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 06:15:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/their-point-of-view-poetry-comes-to-save-us-editorial/ After Black History Month in February and Women’s History Month in March, April brings us National Poetry Month. One could argue that black and women’s history, as well as poetry, should be observed year-round, not just for a month. But grouping events into roughly 30 days helps draw attention to topics we might otherwise overlook. […]]]>

After Black History Month in February and Women’s History Month in March, April brings us National Poetry Month.

One could argue that black and women’s history, as well as poetry, should be observed year-round, not just for a month. But grouping events into roughly 30 days helps draw attention to topics we might otherwise overlook.

I thought National Poetry Month was celebrated in April because it was Shakespeare’s birth month or because of TS Eliot’s opening line in The Waste Land, “April is the most cruel…”

They probably didn’t hurt, but the Academy of American Poets says Black and Women’s History Month inspired National Poetry Month in 1996 to remind people “that poets have a essential role to play in our culture and that poetry matters”.

The academy, despite its government-sounding name, is a charitable organization. Marie Bullock was just 23 when she started the academy in her New York apartment in 1934. It was after studying in France, where she was impressed by the leading role poets play in the French culture.

People also read…

We always hear that poetry may be dead, but miraculously it survives.

A 2017 survey by the National Endowment for the Arts, the most recent, found that 12% of adults had read poetry in the past year. That sounds paltry, but was hailed as encouraging news: it meant 28 million adults were actually reading a poem, and 12% was the highest share of the population to have read poetry in 15 years.

Poetry has been boosted by the inauguration of President Joe Biden. When Amanda Gorman, a 23-year-old black woman, read her beautiful poem, “The Hill We Climb,” at the grand opening (was it only last year?), she became a cultural icon.

Gorman proved that poetry is alive, vibrant and, yes, cool. A collection of his poems, “Call Us What We Carry”, was published in December 2021 and became a New York Times bestseller.

National Poetry Month has become “the largest literary celebration in the world,” says the academy, which offers resources for celebrating poetry at home or in the classroom at www.poets.org.

These include 30 activities, such as writing a poem, reading an e-book of poetry from your local library, buying a book of poetry from your local bookstore, and signing up for a poem per day.

If you’re wondering why bother or what poetry can do for you, USA Poet Laureate Joy Harjo has an answer:

“Poetry can make someone fall in love with you. Poetry can make you fall in love with yourself,” Harjo says in the trailer for his online masterclass in poetic thinking. urge people to read and write poetry, what will do?

Harjo, the first Native American Poet Laureate in U.S. history, will complete her third and final year in the position this month, with several events that will be streamed live on the Library’s YouTube channel and Facebook page. Congress.

For her flagship project, she created “Living Nations, Living Words,” an online presentation and interactive map, to showcase the work of 47 Indigenous poets.

If we ever needed poetry, now is the time. With so much horrific news bombarding us, poetry can be a solace on the page, online or on social media.

People are turning to poetry to help make sense of pandemic, isolation, war and other stresses.

Kitty O’Meara, a retired teacher and chaplain, wrote a hopeful prose poem during the first pandemic lockdown in March 2020. She posted it for a small group of her Facebook friends, and it went viral . It begins:

And people stayed home.

And read books and listen, rest and exercise,

And made art and played games,

And learned new ways of being and still were.

And listened more deeply.

While some grumpy readers complained that O’Meara’s poem reflects a privileged and fantastical view of the first lockdown, it rang true for many others. It was turned into a picture book and an operatic solo that Renee Fleming sang. It was also published in an anthology of pandemic poems.

We can all be grateful to poets as we celebrate poetry this month – and every month.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington. Contact her at: marsha.mercer@yahoo.com

]]>
Here is which poem stanza to choose for Irodori poetry in Genshin Impact https://milpkbk.co.uk/here-is-which-poem-stanza-to-choose-for-irodori-poetry-in-genshin-impact/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/here-is-which-poem-stanza-to-choose-for-irodori-poetry-in-genshin-impact/ Genshin ImpactThe latest event of Hues Of The Violet Garden: Irodori Festival was released a few days ago and fans are wondering which stanza to choose. AFTER: Prepare 4 photos of Inazuman regional specialties, locations, roster in Genshin Impact In the Hues Of The Violet Garden: Irodori Festival we have a number of events, which […]]]>

Genshin ImpactThe latest event of Hues Of The Violet Garden: Irodori Festival was released a few days ago and fans are wondering which stanza to choose.

  • AFTER: Prepare 4 photos of Inazuman regional specialties, locations, roster in Genshin Impact

In the Hues Of The Violet Garden: Irodori Festival we have a number of events, which include several parts of True Tales Of The Violet Garden. Within each act of True Tales Of The Violet Garden, there are several events that players can participate in. It includes The Moon and Stars Inscribe, Friendship In Writing Event as well as the A Story For You quest. The latest includes a quest for Yoimiya and Klee, and it’s something fans are very fond of. Similarly, the Friendship In Writing event allows players to get a free Xiangqiu. It was quite a surprise for fans, and many were thrilled to receive a character for free.

Genshin Impact | “Kamisato Ayato: Unfathomable Whirlwinds in the Forest” Character Demo –

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Genshin Impact | “Kamisato Ayato: Unfathomable Whirlwinds in the Forest” Character Demo –

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Here is which poem stanza to choose for Irodori poetry in Genshin Impact

As for The Moon and Stars Inscribe event, it’s a bit tricky and players have some issues completing the quest. Unlike the other quest, it is not straightforward and requires players to complete a number of tasks in order to complete the quest. To start, players need to speak with Ootomo and Lenne to start the questline. After that, players will need to take a snapshot of a variety of things, including specialties and animals from Inazuma and Mondstadt.

The final task asks players to choose a poem stanza. A few players are a bit confused about this and are wondering which stanza of the poem to choose for the quest. Well, the good news is that you can choose any stanza. Whichever you choose, the quest outcome remains the same and all of them will give the same result. So just pick any stanza you like, and you’re good to go.

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