Poetry – Milp KBK http://milpkbk.co.uk/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 07:07:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://milpkbk.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-22-120x120.png Poetry – Milp KBK http://milpkbk.co.uk/ 32 32 Collection of poetry | Otago Daily Times News Online https://milpkbk.co.uk/collection-of-poetry-otago-daily-times-news-online/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 14:30:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/collection-of-poetry-otago-daily-times-news-online/ Hamesh Wyatt reviews recent works of poetry. UNSEASONED CAMPAIGNJanet NewmanOtago University Press Life, death and work on the family farm are at the center of Inexperienced activist by Janet Newman. These poems are powerful and beautiful, warm and charming. Redemption is in the hearts and hands of those who carry their story, the dignity of […]]]>

Hamesh Wyatt reviews recent works of poetry.

UNSEASONED CAMPAIGN
Janet Newman
Otago University Press

Life, death and work on the family farm are at the center of Inexperienced activist by Janet Newman.

These poems are powerful and beautiful, warm and charming. Redemption is in the hearts and hands of those who carry their story, the dignity of the characters endures.

An entire section is devoted to memories of Newman’s father, also a farmer. Cattle and farm dogs complete these pages.

“Drought”
After the mother died, the father said
he would get used to living alone
the way the rye in its pens is doing
without rain.

Newman offers first-rate poems that maintain the messy balance between sacred and secular, contemporary and ancient.

SEA LIGHT
Dinah hawken
Victoria University Press

Sea light is the ninth collection of poems by Dinah Hawken. This wise woman illuminates the small details in search of peace and connection in a volatile world. Everything seems to come easily. It might just be watching a woman on a train, or seeing the sea taking up most of her attention.

“Mist”

… Some see it as a select company
or a top view
like this one from the foredeck,
where the light of the sea surrounds the island
as fantasy surrounds reality
and does a third thing, beauty,
in the evening, from the sea

Environment and connection come to the fore in these poems. Hawken digs deep, feeds on chaos, and many of these poems skyrocket.

ALL THE CHILDREN OF TITO
Tim Grgec
Victoria University Press

Tim Grgec wanted to play for the Blackcaps but ended up writing All of Tito’s children, a collection of political and social poems.

It’s pretty darn ambitious, right off the bat. Grgec is a poet in the making, gloomy and bewitching. I love how these poems can be enjoyed like a Monet, or peeled like an onion. The payoff is almost always deep.

“Constitution of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, 1953” ends:
… In my eighteenth year, I was supposed to join the army.
My aunt gave me a cut throat razor,
ma majka, a book she had put on in her hand.
She told me the pages scared her, the empty space
only I could fill.

SHELTER
Kirsten Le Harivel
Cuban press

Kirsten Le Harivel has made her home in many places: UK, Japan, India and New Zealand. She lives in all these places in her poems.

Shelter bubbles beautifully on its own light and shiny terms. It leaves the reader with a sense of wonder and wonder.

“Early in the morning”

She had stopped drinking an hour ago and fled to the sea.
others were still there in the back garden, their bro-slur-stumble-laugh
punctuated by the push and pull of the waves. The tide was low and the
the smell of the exposed seaweed arose; it reminded him of Steve, after
sex. His hands were sunk deep in the sand; it was soft and cool as the sky
turning. She wondered why he hadn’t come.

REJOY YOURSELF IN THE PLACE
Peter Hooper
Cold hub press

Peter Hooper (1919-91) was a novelist, teacher, environmentalist and poet. Some would say he was the Westland winner. Rather rejoice is his collected poems, over 200 pages. His little collection Earth marriage (1972), who also had photographs of the west coast, sold over 2,000 copies in one year.

“Penciled in by the rain”

summer blue tides
go down
mussel beaches
of the sky
the heron searching the swamp
is standing
above his yellow eye
fall
and mist like mown rushes
is in fallen slopes
along the roots of the mountain.

Friend and fan Pat White adds an insightful introduction. These old poems can still turn you around in six ways starting on Sunday. That is the power. It’s a chance for a reader to sit down and enjoy.

MEET RITA
Jenny powell
Cold hub press

This is a collection of poems inspired by New Zealand artist Rita Angus (1908-70). Thanks to work, she becomes the friend of Jenny Powell. They share their experiences, talk about clothes, love, place, painting, poetry and life.

Powell brings together a bunch of emotionally charged poems. There are a few cheeky looks, but as usual she looks unflinchingly at the mess. I like when she can be direct.

“Gaz factory”

The boy on the bike
wiped her face with snot tears
across his sleeve.
He had cycled the dead weight
her dog’s bag
under the click of its wearer
to the men of the gas plant
who could take care of it.
That’s what his mother said.
The boy on the bike
I did not know what to do…

SLEEPING WITH STONES
Barford Series
Anahera press

The fifth collection of poems in the Barford series is divided equally according to the seasons of the year. This time, she mourns the death of her beloved Alain. It is the work of a woman who has lived; a real love letter.

“Heartbeat”

the melody of the sun is a deep pulsation
the heartbeat of our universe
solar storms gallop in all directions
o fea le alofa?
where is the love?

Sleeping with stones is intriguing. It is open-hearted poetry. There is no denying his absolute belief in every word.

SKINNY DIP
ed. Susan Paris & Kate De Goldi
Massey University Press

Skinny dip is an anthology of poetry from the creators of the famous Annuals to nurture the next generation of readers and poem makers. Young readers in grades 7-10 receive a crash course in the range of poetic forms.

It’s back to the old schoolyard: kapa haka, PE, homework, school camps. Many of our best appear: Sam Duckor-Jones, Nina Mingya Powles, Nick Ascroft, Bill Manhire, and Freya Daly Sadgrove. Older readers may appreciate the sly humor and retro flair.

“Dad helps with math homework”

He does.
But help.
Absorbed, he silences me.
He says come on, don’t be a jerk!
He is.

SLIDES: CRICKET POEMS
Marc Pirie
HeadworX

Mark Pirie’s cricket poems have been featured regularly in The Cricket Society News Bulletin over the past decade. Slips gathers a bunch of them as players are surveyed, matches and tests reviewed, and there is commentary on the more social aspects of cricket.

Pirie knows that poetry is always there to capture that moment and bring it back to life, especially when our memories start to fade.

“Martin Crowe”

“Crowe was so good he would play you like a spinner.”
My quick friend told me like a great one-liner.
Hogan, they called him, a man with a nice punching game,
“I don’t remember anyone who could match him in his day.”
News of her cancer cut like a knife, New Zealand has come into bleak days
For the cricket. He had given a lot since; clarified his laity.
Memories are majestic sleeves in the middle:
A fine musician pictured at work with his violin.

Pirie has always had a bit of courage and grunt in her work, as well as a sensitive touch. The bat hits the ball in these poems full of lucid bittersweetness.

AUP NEW POETS 8
Lily Holloway, Tru Paraha and Modi Deng
Auckland University Press

They are three different poets. Lily Holloway finds excitement in childhood, Tru Paraha knows how to skillfully disperse words across a page, and Modi Deng, a London-based pianist, takes on difficult conversations. The reader is soon called to respect the writing and the sometimes painful reality that these poets seem to inhabit.

“Euston Road”

… it’s confusing –
I lie there, mask on the jaw
thirteen hours late
everyone come home
and wait for me
it’s all gone now –
my person, my fear …

All of these poets have this innate understanding that how you say it is just as important as what you say.

Hamesh Wyatt lives in Bluff. He reads and writes poetry


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Lake County News, California – American Life in Poetry: Dream in which my body is a snowstorm https://milpkbk.co.uk/lake-county-news-california-american-life-in-poetry-dream-in-which-my-body-is-a-snowstorm/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 09:08:21 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/lake-county-news-california-american-life-in-poetry-dream-in-which-my-body-is-a-snowstorm/ Kwame Dawes. Courtesy photo. Sometimes “dream poems” report strange revelations from our subconscious, and sometimes, as here, the “dream poem” is the poem of wishes and hope, expressing a fantasy of a certain nostalgia. AD Lauren-Abunassar’s poem, “Dream in which my body is a snowstorm,” imagines a world in which “bad” results are turned upside […]]]>

Kwame Dawes. Courtesy photo.

Sometimes “dream poems” report strange revelations from our subconscious, and sometimes, as here, the “dream poem” is the poem of wishes and hope, expressing a fantasy of a certain nostalgia.

AD Lauren-Abunassar’s poem, “Dream in which my body is a snowstorm,” imagines a world in which “bad” results are turned upside down by some sort of magical hope; and here we have a lesson in the innocent pleasure of wishing for good by the force of imagining.

Dream in which my body is a snowstorm
By AD Lauren-Abunassar

and don’t make anyone cold. If I fell, I would fall
in state-shaped flakes. One for every place in my body
lingered. One for every little piece of light that I stole
and preserved. No cars without starting. No tangled roads. Neck
become a mountain of drift; foot getting fierce kicking
swirls. The heat wouldn’t melt me. Hands wouldn’t help
undo me. Cover gently. Fantasy not pretend.
Dream in which my body is a snowstorm and the storm says
a goal falling.

American Life in Poetry does not accept unsolicited manuscripts. It is made possible by The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poésie magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright © 2020 by AD Lauren-Abunassar, “Dream in Which My Body Is a Snow Storm” by Nimrod International Journal, Fall / Winter, 2020. Poem reprinted with permission from the author and publisher. Introduction copyright © 2021 by The Poetry Foundation. The author of the introduction, Kwame Dawes, is the George W. Holmes professor of English and Glenna Luschei editor of Prairie Schooner at the University of Nebraska.


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Take a look inside the illustrated book “Dirty Poetry” by Ivan Moody https://milpkbk.co.uk/take-a-look-inside-the-illustrated-book-dirty-poetry-by-ivan-moody/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 18:42:08 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/take-a-look-inside-the-illustrated-book-dirty-poetry-by-ivan-moody/ Ivan Moody of Five Finger Death Punch has unveiled his new book of illustrated poetry, Dirty poetry from the contagious and twisted mind of Ivan L. Moody, and if you are planning to buy it, we can give you a preview of several other pages. It’s a visually intriguing job with Blake Armstrong creating eye-catching […]]]>

Ivan Moody of Five Finger Death Punch has unveiled his new book of illustrated poetry, Dirty poetry from the contagious and twisted mind of Ivan L. Moody, and if you are planning to buy it, we can give you a preview of several other pages.

It’s a visually intriguing job with Blake Armstrong creating eye-catching illustrations to accompany Moody’s “chimerically twisted” prose. The singer’s words are scrawled into the artwork, often accompanied by dark figures or simply dark. It is a beautifully designed book as shown by the additional five pages below.

“Of all the projects I have undertaken, this is something really out of the ordinary, completely unorthodox and without“ creative walls. ”It is by far the strangest thing I have ever done ( and that means something), “Moody first commented when the book was announced. “I had no idea how it would turn out, but luckily – between Blake and myself – I’m delighted with this first edition of Dirty poetry. “

Dirty poetry definitely stands out as one of the freest and most unique creative experiences I have had in my career. Ivan’s overall vision for this book was so twisted and enticing that it would have been hard to pull away from it. Our collaboration has been really great, and I think the love shows on every page. My only hope is that readers appreciate the book at least half as much as we worked on it. It’s gratifying to be a part of something so strange, unexpected and special. “

There are 104 pages in all, filled with wonderful illustrations alongside the singer’s captivating words. Check out the page preview below and if you like what you see, Ivan Moody’s Dirty Poetry, vol. 1 is currently available through the Z2 comic book store.

‘Dirty Poetry Vol. 1 ‘pages

Check out some of the prose and illustrations from Ivan Moody’s new book.

70 best rock + metal albums of 2020


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Out and about on WRAL.com https://milpkbk.co.uk/out-and-about-on-wral-com/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 20:46:16 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/out-and-about-on-wral-com/ By Amber Brown MYSTERY / THRILLER Apollo’s Murders by Chris Hadfield Full of fascinating technical details that fans of The Martian loved, and that recall the claustrophobia, twists and thrilling tension of The Red October Hunt, The Apollo Murders is a high-stakes thriller like no other. Chris Hadfield captures the fierce G-forces of launch, the […]]]>

MYSTERY / THRILLER

Apollo’s Murders by Chris Hadfield
Full of fascinating technical details that fans of The Martian loved, and that recall the claustrophobia, twists and thrilling tension of The Red October Hunt, The Apollo Murders is a high-stakes thriller like no other. Chris Hadfield captures the fierce G-forces of launch, the frozen loneliness of space, and the fear of hanging on the outside of a spacecraft orbiting Earth at 17,000 miles per hour as the the only one to have experienced all of these things in real life. can.

The madness of the crowds by Louise Penny
While residents of the Quebec village of Three Pines take advantage of the deep snow to ski and toboggan, the Chief Inspector sees his family vacation interrupted by a simple request. He was asked to provide security for a conference at the nearby university. Gamache begins to investigate Professor Abigail Robinson and discovers a program so disgusting that he begs the university to cancel the lecture. They refuse, citing academic freedom, and accuse Gamache of censorship and intellectual cowardice. Before long, Professor Robinson’s opinions begin to creep into conversations, so that the truth and the facts, the reality and the delusion are so muddled that it’s almost impossible to tell them apart. Discussions become debates, debates become arguments, which turn into fights. As the camps are declared, madness sets in.

A line to kill

A line to kill by Anthony Horowitz
When ex-Detective Inspector Daniel Hawthorne and his sidekick, author Anthony Horowitz, are invited to an exclusive literary festival on Alderney, an idyllic island off the south coast of England, they don’t expect to find himself in the middle of a murder investigation … or to be trapped with a cold-blooded killer in a remote place with a murky and haunted past. Both a brilliant satire on the world of books and writers and an immensely enjoyable locked room mystery, A Line to Kill is a triumph – an enigma of a story full of brilliant misdirection, beautifully clues. exposures and devilishly intelligent endings.

The list of judges by John Grisham
Investigator Lacy Stoltz follows the trail of a serial killer and gets close to a shocking suspect, a sitting judge. Suspicions are easy enough, but proof seems impossible. The man is brilliant, patient and always ahead of the police. He’s the most cunning of all serial killers. He knows forensic medicine, police procedure and most importantly: he knows the law. He has a list, with the names of his victims and targets, all of unsuspecting people unlucky enough to have crossed his path and harmed him in one way or another. How can Lacy go after him, without becoming the next name on his list?

The velvet was the night

The velvet was the night by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
From Todd: “Cigarette smoke winds through every scene in Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s new detective story. Elvis and Maite, the rock’n roll and comic book-loving twin protagonists, must follow a missing woman in Mexico City in the 1970s before all the bad people find her first. While the dark plot finally caught my eye, it was the unlucky characters of Moreno-Garcia who grabbed me from the start and never let go until the very end.

The Man Who Died Twice: A Thursday Murder Club Mystery by Richard Osman
An unexpected visitor arrives accused of stealing diamonds worth millions from bad men. Then the first body is found. Elizabeth, Joyce, Ron and Ibrahim confront a ruthless murderer who would not hesitate to bring down four septuagenarians. Can our four friends catch the killer before the killer catches them? What if they also find the diamonds? Well, wouldn’t that be a bonus? You should never put anything beyond the Thursday Murder Club. Richard Osman is back with everyone’s favorite mystery-solving quartet, and the second installment of The Thursday Murder Club The series is just as smart and warm as the first – timeless reading pleasure and bursting with laughter.

SCIENCE-FICTION / FANTASY / HORROR

Under the whispering door

Under the whispering door by TJ Klune
When a Reaper comes to pick up Wallace at his own funeral, Wallace begins to suspect that he might be dead. And when Hugo, the owner of a particular tea shop, promises to help him cross, Wallace decides he’s definitely dead. But even in death, he’s not ready to give up the life he’s barely lived, so when Wallace is given a week to go through, he sets out to live a life in seven days. Hilarious, bewitching and kind, Under the whispering door is an uplifting story about a life spent in the office and a death spent building a house.

Vampire empire by Jay Kristoff
It has been 27 years since the last sunrise. For nearly three decades, vampires have waged war against humanity. Gabriel de León is a silver saint: member of a holy brotherhood dedicated to the defense of the kingdom and the church against vampires. But even the Silver Order couldn’t stem the tide after daylight failed us, and now only Gabriel remains. Imprisoned by the monsters he has sworn to destroy, the last silver saint is forced to tell his story. A story of legendary battles and forbidden love, of lost faith and friendships won, wars of blood and the Eternal King and the quest for humanity’s last hope: the Holy Grail.

Knowledge of Olympus

History of Olympus: Volume 1 by Rachel Smythe
Persephone, the young goddess of spring, is new to Olympus. Her mother, Demeter, raised her in the realm of mortals, but after Persephone promises to train as a holy virgin, she is allowed to live in the glamorous and rapidly changing world of the gods. When Artemis takes her to a party, her entire life changes: she ends up meeting Hades and feels an immediate spark with the charming but misunderstood ruler of the Underworld. Now she must navigate the politics and confusing relationships that rule Olympus, while discovering her own place – and her own power.

The last graduate by Naomi Novik
“Our beloved school does its best to devour all of its students, but now that I have reached my senior year and have actually won a handful of allies for myself, they have suddenly developed a very special envy for me. . And although somehow I make it through the endless waves of hex that he keeps throwing at me between grueling duties, I have no idea how my allies and I are going to make it through. living graduation room. With insight and biting humor, Novik reminds us that sometimes it’s not enough to rewrite the rules, sometimes you have to throw out the whole rulebook.

Death of Jane Lawrence

The death of Jane Lawrence by Caitlin Starling
Emma says: “A mixture of The Haunting of Hill House and Rebecca, this book is both a gothic love story, a guide to ritual magic, and an obsession of the most puzzling variety. Once I entered the story, I couldn’t let go. There’s a lonely, crumbling mansion, metaphysics, and an author who refuses to give you flat ground on which to stabilize while reading. I loved the vestiges of ancient literature in the setting and the pressing feeling that remained with me long after the last sentence. If you are a fan of the macabre, there is no better book to read. “

The last house on the useless street by Catriona Ward
In a boarded up house in a cul-de-sac on the edge of Washington’s wild woods lives a family of three. A teenager who is not allowed to go out, not after the last time. A man drinking alone in front of his TV, trying to ignore the gaps in his memory. And a domestic cat who likes to take a nap and read the Bible. An unspeakable secret binds them together, but when a new neighbor moves in next door, what is buried among the birches can come back to haunt them all.

POETRY

Call us what we transport

Call us what we wear: poems by Amanda Gorman
Presidential inaugural poet Amanda Gorman’s collection of luminous poetry captures a sinking moment in time and transforms it into words of hope and healing. In Call us what we transport, Gorman explores history, language, identity and erasure through an imaginative and intimate collage. Harnessing the collective grief of a global pandemic, these poems highlight a moment of judgment and reveal that Gorman has become our messenger from the past, our voice for the future.

Hope this finds you well: poems by Kate Baer
The author of the New York Times # 1 bestseller What kind of woman returns with a collection of erasable poems created from notes she received from followers, supporters and detractors – an art form that reclaims the vitriol of online trolls and inspires readers to transform what is ugly or painful in their own life into something beautiful.

You better be lightning

You better be lightning by Andrea Gibson
You better be lightning is a queer, political and feminist collection guided by self-reflection. The poems range from an in-depth examination of the deeply personal to the vastness of the world, exploring the breadth of the human experience from love to disease, from space to climate change, and much more. One of the most famous poets and performers of the past two decades, the honesty and vulnerability of Andrea Gibson is fully on display in You better be lightning, welcoming and inviting readers to be who they are.

Winter recipes from the collective: Poems by Louise Gluck
Winter recipes from the Collective is chamber music, an invitation into this privileged realm small enough for the individual instrument to be heard, mournful, its line sustained, carried, then taken up by the next instrument, fiery, animoso, while being large enough to contain a lifetime, the inconceivable gifts and losses of old age, little princesses rattling in the back of a car, an abandoned passport, the ingredients for an invigorating winter sandwich, the death of a sister, the joyful presence of the sun, its luminosity measured by the darkness it projects.

Rocks

Stones: poems by Kevin Young
Whether it’s the fireflies from a summer in Louisiana caught in a jar (condemned by their collection), or her grandmother, Mama Annie, who locks the screen door when someone comes out for a moment, all of this. is our precarious faltering joy, everything we want to protect is brought to light in this moving book. Rocks becomes an ode to the places of origin of Young and his departed loved ones, and to what poetry can save from us.

Such a color: new and selected poems by Tracy K. Smith
Such a color brings together the best poems from Smith’s award-winning books and culminates in thirty pages of brilliant and scathing new poems. These new works confront racism and the historical and contemporary injustices of America, while also rising to the registers of ecstatic, ecstatic and sacred, inciting us to love as resistance to everything. that hinders it. This magnificent retrospective affirms Smith’s place as one of the most valuable poets of the 21st century.


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Thinking about race in anthropology through poetry https://milpkbk.co.uk/thinking-about-race-in-anthropology-through-poetry/ https://milpkbk.co.uk/thinking-about-race-in-anthropology-through-poetry/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 11:03:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/thinking-about-race-in-anthropology-through-poetry/ On November 3, the McGill Anthropology Graduate Student Association (AGSA) organized the workshop Thinking about race with ethnographic poetry as part of an ongoing series on racism and racial justice in anthropology. Ethnographic poetry is a method of research where anthropologists study the poetic works of an individual with the aim of understanding the poet’s […]]]>

On November 3, the McGill Anthropology Graduate Student Association (AGSA) organized the workshop Thinking about race with ethnographic poetry as part of an ongoing series on racism and racial justice in anthropology. Ethnographic poetry is a method of research where anthropologists study the poetic works of an individual with the aim of understanding the poet’s relationship with his culture, community and audience. This workshop aimed in particular to present the anthropological applications of poetry and to reveal how reading poetry can help anthropologists avoid potential racial prejudice, a pervasive problem in the field.

“The Association of Graduate Students in Anthropology recently launched a task force called the Racial Justice Task Force,” said Alejandra Melian-Morse, one of the event’s organizers, in an interview with The McGill Tribune. “We have been thinking and trying to take more responsibility for racial inequalities in our anthropology department. We wanted to do something more creative, to help people think in different ways on a topic that is very difficult for a lot of people to talk about.

Justin wright, socio-cultural anthropologist, performance poet and current poet in residence at SAPIENS Review animated the workshop. Wright explained how reading poetry is an important component of anthropological research methodology, as it details the story through emotional language. They described how poetry can capture the emotions of the writer at a specific point in time in a way that factual language used in historical documentation cannot. They also explained how their work as a socio-cultural anthropologist examines the many ways blacks experience individual and collective trauma.

“I see anthropology as a method of dealing with the lives of black people,” Wright said. “Poetry also works in this way, as a tool to uncover the unspoken truth of our past. [A poet] answer to [their] world, to what is happening in [their] time. A poem is not just a piece of poetry where it is only for the author. [A poet] does this in the service of [their] community, to help them move forward in a certain way.

Wright explained their “six question method” for reading poetry as ethnographic material: one has to ask who are the author and the audience, what is the subject of the work, when and where the work was. written, what context prompted the writer to compose the poem, and how it was received historically.

“[Poetry and creative prose] often speak directly about the lives and rights of authors, their experiences and cultures, ”said Wright. “We cannot consider this kind of works as anything other than rich experiences, as ways of being of history. Poetry is a meaningful language. When we talk about reading poetry as ethnographic material, […] we are talking about heavy research, engaging its questions in a scholarly way, in the service of ethnography and in the service of anthropology.

Wright fuses their knowledge of anthropology and poetry to explore explorations of historical black traumas with contemporary representations of black experiences. They explain the use of such anthropological methods as a way to broaden their understanding of different cultural considerations.

“Anthropology helps me find a way to orient my poetic devices to get to a certain point, a certain type of emotional logic, a certain argument,” Wright said. “Anthropology has helped me think about what I’m doing specifically with [my poetry]. “

This workshop was one of many other events to come in a series explore the intersection of racial justice and anthropology. Other events include film screenings, creative workshops, as well as interviews with podcasters and content creators.


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conductor returns to head TSO in ‘Symphonic Poetry’ | Arts-and-theater https://milpkbk.co.uk/conductor-returns-to-head-tso-in-symphonic-poetry-arts-and-theater/ https://milpkbk.co.uk/conductor-returns-to-head-tso-in-symphonic-poetry-arts-and-theater/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/conductor-returns-to-head-tso-in-symphonic-poetry-arts-and-theater/ Guest conductor Sarah Hicks conducted the Tulsa Symphony in Mozart’s Overture to “The Abduction of the Seraglio” during the orchestra’s rain-cut performance in October. She will return to conduct the orchestra for the 2021-2022 season. Conductor Sarah Hicks will have another chance to work with the Tulsa Symphony, when she returns to conduct the orchestra […]]]>

Sarah Hicks’ debut with the Tulsa Symphony was just an opening. Literally.

Hicks was scheduled to be the guest conductor for the orchestra’s second performance at ONEOK Field, home of the Tulsa Drillers, in October 2020. The previous month, the orchestra had made history by being the first large orchestra to perform in front of an audience since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Hicks was to lead the orchestra in a concert that would feature Brahms’ Symphony No. 4, as well as Bruch’s “Scottish Fantasy”, performed by the orchestra’s first violin, Rossitza Goza.

The weather, however, had different plans.

“We knew we were probably going to have some trouble during the dress rehearsal, because the wind was blowing the sheet music all over the place,” Hicks recalls. “Then on the day of the concert it was freezing rain.”

However, Hicks and the musicians of the Tulsa Symphony were determined to play something for the audience members who had braved the time. So, in the midst of the wind and the rain, Hicks conducted the orchestra in the Overture of Mozart’s “Abduction from the Seraglio”, before all participants took shelter.

“We wanted to do something for the public,” Hicks said. “But it was also for ourselves. It took us four days to prepare for this concert, and we wanted part of it to come to fruition. “


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Changing Sounds in Spring – The Poetry of Science https://milpkbk.co.uk/changing-sounds-in-spring-the-poetry-of-science/ https://milpkbk.co.uk/changing-sounds-in-spring-the-poetry-of-science/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 09:00:14 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/changing-sounds-in-spring-the-poetry-of-science/ Dawn breaks over thedecreasing soundforced retirement.A forced refrainby the naked and void noisethat permeates our bandwidth.Communities concernedtrace this diminuendodiversity,captured byacoustic accessoriesProvidefuture soundscapesbareof yourand pitchand voice.Imminent silencemarked firmlyby ourextinction ofto live. A Common Firecrest singing in a conifer in Galicia, Spain (Image credit: Noel Feans, via Wikimedia Commons). This poem is inspired by recent research, who […]]]>

Dawn breaks over the
decreasing sound
forced retirement.
A forced refrain
by the naked and void noise
that permeates our bandwidth.
Communities concerned
trace this diminuendo
diversity,
captured by
acoustic accessories
Provide
future soundscapes
bare
of your
and pitch
and voice.
Imminent silence
marked firmly
by our
extinction of
to live.

A Common Firecrest singing in a conifer in Galicia, Spain (Image credit: Noel Feans, via Wikimedia Commons).

This poem is inspired by recent research, who found that the sounds of spring change, with dawn choirs across North America and Europe becoming calmer and less varied.

The extinction of experience concerns the loss of human-nature interactions. These interactions can take a wide variety of forms, including walking in wilderness areas, visiting urban green spaces, listening to birdsong, picking flowers, or catching insects. Unfortunately, this extinction of experience leads to an increasing disconnection between man and nature, with negative impacts on physical health, cognitive abilities and well-being. Not only does this loss reduce the important benefits people derive from these interactions, it can also undermine their support for biodiversity policies and management actions, and thus play an important role in shaping the future of the biodiversity. As such, it is extremely important to help make some of these losses more visible and responsible.

In this new study, the researchers used annual bird count data for more than 200,000 sites in North America and Europe and combined them with records of more than 1,000 species from a database. online calls and songs of birds. This was then used to reconstruct the historic soundscapes of these sites from 1996 to 2018, with their acoustic characteristics quantified using four indices designed to quantify the diversity and intensity of each soundscape as a whole. Analyzing these clues, the researchers found a widespread decline in the acoustic diversity and intensity of these natural soundscapes, driven by changes in the composition of bird communities, with the decline most pronounced in the spring, when the birds are the most vocally active. The researchers also observed that the sites that experienced the greatest declines in bird populations also had the greatest declines in diversity and acoustic intensity. This research highlights that measures are now needed to ensure the protection and recovery of high quality natural soundscapes in order to prevent their further deterioration, and to guard against the associated impacts that this loss will have on our own link with nature, to try to stop this extinction of experience.


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The curvy poetry of “Peepal Tree” blunts the message https://milpkbk.co.uk/the-curvy-poetry-of-peepal-tree-blunts-the-message/ https://milpkbk.co.uk/the-curvy-poetry-of-peepal-tree-blunts-the-message/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 01:16:25 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/the-curvy-poetry-of-peepal-tree-blunts-the-message/ The Times pledges to review theatrical releases during the Covid-19 pandemic. As going to the movies is risky during this time, readers are reminded to follow health and safety guidelines such as: described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health officials. Bio on the Indian filmmaker’s website Kranti Kanade says he […]]]>

The Times pledges to review theatrical releases during the Covid-19 pandemic. As going to the movies is risky during this time, readers are reminded to follow health and safety guidelines such as: described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health officials.

Bio on the Indian filmmaker’s website Kranti Kanade says he has planted over 8,000 trees. This kind of environmental concern is the driving force behind his latest film, “Peepal Tree,” in which Kanadé plays a conscientious man driven to activism after discovering that the police school adjacent to his property was illegally cutting down old peepals and banyan trees. (These varieties of figs have historical and religious significance in India.)

Initially, the situation, which we are told is inspired by real events, creates a kind of bureaucratic comedy, with the character of Kanadé (named “He” in the credits) and his wife (Eesha Thaker like, you l ‘will have guessed, “She”) complain to the police about her own offense, which they then learn is an offense without the power of arrest. When shame, logic, and spirited harangues about ecology get the couple nowhere with their neighbors, they turn to a tree activist (Vinay Sharma) steeped in toothless environmental laws that have allowed developers to crack down without any penalty. He introduces the couple to a community of like-minded citizens who meet regularly to disrupt the felling of trees.

Filmed in a pocket-sized style, adjacent to the documentary, which favors argument and humor over conventional storytelling or character-building, “Peepal Tree” claims a compelling immediacy to its central issue, presented – with precision – as a threat to life everywhere. But he also suffers from a (hum) uprooting in his tones and structure, so that the enlightenment is always blunted by the meanders of his poetry and his passion. When we can’t figure out who the central couple is, for example, the journey seems like a glance, not a consequence.

Although the seriousness of its purpose and its images of entire, pruned trees make “Peepal Tree” intermittently convincing, one wishes the sharper daring of Kanadé’s latest film, the elegant drama school melodrama “CRD “, or in fact here to revive the urgency of what is clearly a deeply personal crusade for the filmmaker.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.


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Poetry, the Edgemere Diner and the Vernon Hotel https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-the-edgemere-diner-and-the-vernon-hotel/ https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-the-edgemere-diner-and-the-vernon-hotel/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 18:27:33 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-the-edgemere-diner-and-the-vernon-hotel/ AUTO IMAGE ORDER, EASIER: Dinners are one of those things close to the soul of Worcester and the surrounding area. After all, they were building them here. This is probably why everyone is so nervous every time something happens to them, whether they close or change owners or whatever. Each change is a small blow […]]]>

AUTO IMAGE ORDER, EASIER: Dinners are one of those things close to the soul of Worcester and the surrounding area. After all, they were building them here. This is probably why everyone is so nervous every time something happens to them, whether they close or change owners or whatever. Each change is a small blow to the region’s sense of self, and seen as the herald of a coming calamity. Which, of course, might well be true, although it should be noted that diners and other restaurants change hands or go bankrupt with some regularity, usually for trivial reasons. Yet when Harley-Davidson threatened the Miss Worcester Diner over a mural depicting her logo, supporters quickly rallied. When Corner Lunch changed hands, it was followed with great interest. When the Sherwood Diner was moved to Polar Park to become the new home of the WooSox Foundation, there was a discussion as to whether this was an act of preservation or taxidermy.

The Sherwood Diner has moved to Polar Park to become the new home of the WooSox Foundation.

EDGEMERE, REVISITED: Maybe that’s why, then, when I read Kim Ring’s item on Edgemere Diner in Shrewsbury auctioned, I couldn’t help but think of the title poem at Steven Riel’s new collection of poetry, “Edgemere”. In the poem, Riel – a Boston-based poet from Monson with family ties to Worcester – captures the empty desolation of this stretch of Route 20 with his echo of companies that use “Edgemere” in their name: “Looking out the windows of the car / who’d replenish Edge- / Mere Diner: Edgemere Mini / Mart; Edgemere compact; Edgemere Drive-In, sprinkled with saplings, / its empty driveway / marquee large enough to sport a dual feature. Riel’s book features a photograph of the now defunct Edgemere Drive-In sign, which has now disappeared, although locals intend to renovate it. The future, it seems, is moving forward, leaving us to decide which pieces to keep. Is it conservation or taxidermy? After all, it’s hard not to have mixed feelings when you see the Spag sign in the produce section of Shrewsbury Whole Foods. That, and naming the store’s restaurant the Borgatti Bar, after Anthony “Spag” Borgatti, still seems a bit as if the store is trying too hard to be seen as “honoring Spag’s legacy.” Be warned, Whole Foods’ prices aren’t as bad as it’s often claimed – a rep who has earned them the nickname “Whole Paycheck” – but they don’t give away free tomato plants either. When do we honor the past and fetishize it instead?

The Vernon Hotel in Kelley Square is scheduled to reopen on November 4.

HOTEL VERNON STILL STANDING: The good news is that the Vernon hotel should reopen on Thursday, November 4th. The new hours of operation were not yet available at the time of writing, but it’s always good to see one of the watches again in action after being closed for so long, between the COVID-pandemic. 19 and renovations. The classic bar, which was the subject of Lea Graham’s 2019 poetry collection, “From the Hotel Vernon”, reportedly received a cleaning and new beer taps, among other changes, but is otherwise the same, with accessories such as the Captain Burl Ives wheel bequeathed to the bar still prominently in the ships room and the mural that would have been painted by Al Capp always present. Will there be any other changes to come? This is an open question. Maybe it will eventually be a museum piece or item in a historic Worcester theme park, or maybe it will just be kept in poetry, but for now it’s good to have some something that remains familiar, while the world around it changes.


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Poetry of Palestinian resistance by Mahmoud Darwish – Middle East Monitor https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-of-palestinian-resistance-by-mahmoud-darwish-middle-east-monitor/ https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-of-palestinian-resistance-by-mahmoud-darwish-middle-east-monitor/#respond Sat, 30 Oct 2021 12:45:00 +0000 https://milpkbk.co.uk/poetry-of-palestinian-resistance-by-mahmoud-darwish-middle-east-monitor/ Mahmoud Darwish is the best known Palestinian poet and writer internationally, although still little known in Brazil. He is the author of 30 books of poetry and eight books of prose, translated into more than 40 languages, and winner of the Prize for Cultural Freedom, the Lannan Foundation (United States), the Lenin Prize for Peace […]]]>

Mahmoud Darwish is the best known Palestinian poet and writer internationally, although still little known in Brazil. He is the author of 30 books of poetry and eight books of prose, translated into more than 40 languages, and winner of the Prize for Cultural Freedom, the Lannan Foundation (United States), the Lenin Prize for Peace ( ex-Soviet Union) and was named Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by France. His works in the 1960s and 1970s reflect his opposition to the occupation of his homeland.

“He was the prince of words, and his name was Mahmoud Darwish,” said Lebanese novelist Elias Khoury. Darwish was a very sensitive poet with a fighting spirit who used poetic phrases such as: “How can a hand write if it is not creative when brewing coffee.”

Besides the drafting of the resounding Declaration of Independence of Palestine, proclaimed by the head of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) Yasser Arafat, on November 15, 1988, in Algiers, Algeria, he has always taken a position firm in the defense of the liberation of Palestine. . As a result, he withdrew from the organization after the Oslo Accords, signed in 1993, which he called a “give and take” between the PLO and Israel. Darwish considered the Oslo Accords to be “the greatest recklessness ever committed by a leader [Arafat] to their people. “

OPINION: Imagine Palestine, Barghouti, Darwich, Kanafani and the language of exile

Darwish was born in the Palestinian village of Al-Birwa, Galilee, in 1941, to a Sunni family of small farmers. He was the second of eight siblings. The village where he was born was occupied and razed by the occupying Zionist forces during the Nakba process in 1948. This led the Darwish to take refuge in Lebanon for a year, where they began to live as “foreigners”. “. On his return, the poet found that his house in Al-Birwa had been replaced by a Jewish settlement with the new name of “Ahihud”.

He was arrested several times between 1961 and 1967 for reciting poetry and traveling between villages in occupied Palestine “without permission” by “Jewish state” forces. His poem “Identity Card”, which was turned into a protest song, resulted in his house arrest warrant. After these persecutions and arrests, Darwish was forced into exile, which led him to places like Cairo, Tunis, Moscow, Beirut and Paris, only to return in 1996, when he was allowed by occupation to attend funerals.

Palestinian culture and heritage are the best weapon against the occupation – Caricature [Sabaaneh/MiddleEastMonitor]

The expulsion of Palestinians is a recurring theme in Darwish’s work. It depicts the trajectory of anguish, pain and suffering due to deaths and evictions since the creation of the “State of Israel” and calls Palestine the “lost paradise” and the “land of divine messages” revealed to mankind ”, as described in Declaration of Independence. His work reveals the unbroken and unchanged organic relationship between the Palestinian people, their land and their history.

The Brazilian public will be able to get to know this poet of the Palestinian soul with the launch of the book Memória para o esquecimento (Memory for oblivion) (Editora Tabla, 216 pages), published October 22, 2021. The presentation was made by Safa Jubran, who translated the book into Portuguese, and by Professor Geraldo Campos, a dear friend, coordinator of the Study Center Arab and Islamic Studies from the Federal University of Sergipe. It is one of three Darwish books available to Brazilian readers, published in Brazil by Editora Tabla.

The book recounts personal memories of August 6, 1982, coincidentally, the anniversary of the US terrorist attack on Hiroshima. It was one of 88 days of the siege in which Zionist state planes dropped bombs on Beirut, killing people – a reality Darwish experienced closely during his exile in Lebanon. The book looks back on the meaning of exile – and not of the diaspora – and on the role of the writer in times of crisis and war. His work expresses his love for Palestine and its people, who “have existed and have resisted” for over 73 years.

The published books make up for the lack of Darwish works in Portuguese, such as those published last year: Da Presença da Ausência (In the presence of absence), translated directly from Arabic by Marco Calil; and Eleven Astros (Eleven stars), translated by Michel Sleiman. Another book by Darwish published in Brazil is A Terra nos é estreita e outros poemas (Earth is close to us and other poems) (تضيق بنا الارض), translated from Arabic by Paulo Daniel Farah (Bibliaspa, 2012).

Darwish’s work is steeped in testimonies of life and struggle, marked by suffering in exile and the attempt to uproot the Palestinian people from their land. The author’s poems and stories bring an intimate feeling that is the same as that of the Palestinian people, in which resistance, by any means, is the only way to survive and the only way to liberate Palestine from it. Zionist colonial occupation.

BOOK REVIEW: I don’t want this poem to end: early and late poems

Darwish has never renounced his status as a resistant Palestinian national poet, making it clear in every line of his work that the suffering of Palestinians is not just that of those living under occupation or in exile. Such torment belongs to everyone, since the crimes perpetrated daily by the Jewish state are crimes against humanity.

The question present in Darwish’s work is a question that everyone asks: why should the Palestinians recognize the State of Israel in the territory of historic Palestine without defined borders and in permanent expansion, and agree to small islands of land as if Palestine were a mini-state? The author himself answers it in his poem “Identity Card”: “Is the government going to take the stones away from me, as they told me?” Then he writes at the top of the first page: “I hate no one, I do not steal from anyone. But if I am hungry, I will devour the flesh of the usurper. Watch out! Watch out for my hunger, Watch out for my anger! “

The opinions expressed in this article are the property of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Monitor.


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